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June 2015 Healthwise E-links – Genetic Testing

Angelina Jolie sparked a public discussion about genetic testing when she revealed her decision to undergo preventive surgeries after testing positive for the BRCA1 gene. Genetic testing can reveal your risk of diseases like breast cancer, colon cancer, and Huntington’s disease. Tests can also show the chance that a baby has a certain birth defect, like Down syndrome. The results of any genetic test can have a huge impact on people’s lives, so it’s important for people to understand what kind of results they’ll get and the decisions they’ll face based on those results. To help educate your patients about the different genetic tests available, we’re dedicating this issue of E-links to genetic testing.

How to use e-links

Keep your website content fresh and engaging with Healthwise E-links. The copy promotes timely health themes by highlighting topics in the Healthwise® Knowledgebase. Use the sample copy below on your website homepage or condition-specific pages, and create links to the related Healthwise Knowledgebase topics. You can also place the copy in emails, newsletters, or any other consumer outreach programs.

DNA structureShould you have a BRCA gene test?

You’ve probably seen or heard the BRCA gene test in the news recently. And you may be wondering if you should have the test. People with BRCA gene changes are at high risk for getting breast or ovarian cancer. Knowing you are at high risk may involve making some hard decisions about options to reduce your risk, such as surgery to remove your breasts or ovaries. Talk to your doctor about the pros and cons of a BRCA gene test, and your preferences and concerns. To help prepare for that conversation, here’s an easy-to-use tool to help you weigh your options and determine what matters most to you. [Create a hyperlink to the Breast Cancer Risk: Should I Have a BRCA Gene Test? Decision Point on your website. DOCHWID=tu6462]

Are you at risk for colon cancer?

Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in the United States and Canada for both men and women. Also called colorectal cancer, it begins with small growths on the inner wall of the colon called polyps. A genetic test for colon cancer can tell whether you have the rare gene mutations. Although most people diagnosed with colon cancer don’t have one of these mutated genes, if you do have one, it greatly increases your chance of getting colon cancer. Use this guide to help you make an informed decision about whether testing is right for you. [Create a hyperlink to the Colon Cancer Genetic Testing Topic Overview on your website. DOCHWID=uf6901]

Should your baby be screened for birth defects?

From breast-feeding to options for giving birth, you face many important decisions during pregnancy. In your first trimester, you may be wondering whether you should screen your baby for birth defects, such as Down syndrome or sickle cell anemia. Deciding about screening tests can be very difficult and emotional. It’s important for you and your partner to think about how the results may affect your choices about your pregnancy. This interactive tool will help you understand the pros and cons of screening and help you uncover your feelings and concerns. [Create a hyperlink to the Pregnancy: Should I Have Screening Tests for Birth Defects? Decision Point on your website. DOCHWID=aa21828]

Huntington’s disease: To test or not to test?

Triggered by a changed gene, Huntington’s disease is a rare condition that causes rapid, jerky body movements. It also leads to a loss of mental skills, such as memory and problem solving. A blood test can show whether you inherited the changed gene. Some people don’t want to know they have the gene; for others, knowing helps them plan. Like all genetic tests, the decision to test for Huntington’s disease is personal. Learn about the pros and cons of testing for Huntington’s disease here. [Create a hyperlink to the Huntington’s Disease Genetic Test Topic Overview on your website. DOCHWID=uf6792]

One-stop resource for genetic conditions

Genes determine what we inherit from our parents, from eye color and blood type to certain diseases. You might be wondering whether you should have a BRCA gene test to see your risk for breast or ovarian cancer. Or maybe you’re wondering whether to screen your unborn baby for birth defects like Down syndrome. In this learning center, you’ll find a list of topics to help you understand different genetic conditions and the pros and cons of testing. It’s a one-stop resource for genetic conditions that’s full of useful facts, information, and interactive tools, and it can help you find answers and decide what test might be right for you. [Create a hyperlink to the Genetic Conditions Learning Center on your website. DOCHWID=center1018]

Teaser for your social media sites and campaigns

  • Is the BRCA gene test right for you? Get the facts you need and weigh your options with this interactive tool. [Insert a shortened URL to the Breast Cancer Risk: Should I Have a BRCA Gene Test? Decision Point on your website. DOCHWID=tu6462]
  • Are you at high risk for colon cancer? Decide whether the genetic test is right for you. [Insert a shortened URL to the Colon Cancer Genetic Testing Topic Overview on your website. DOCHWID=uf6901]
  • Wondering whether to screen your baby for birth defects? Weigh the pros and cons with this interactive guide. [Insert a shortened URL to the Pregnancy: Should I Have Screening Tests for Birth Defects? Decision Point on your website. DOCHWID=aa21828]
  • Worried that you might carry the Huntington’s disease gene? Learn about a genetic test that can tell you if you have it. [Insert a shortened URL to the Huntington’s Disease Genetic Test Topic Overview on your website. DOCHWID=uf6792]
  • Have questions about genetic testing and what the results can tell you? This helpful resource can help you find answers. [Insert a shortened URL to the Genetic Conditions Learning Center on your website. DOCHWID=center1018]